Senin, 30 Desember 2013

Football Basics - Lofted pass techniques

Why use lofted pass?

Although ground passes are easier for the receiver to control the ball, there are some occasions that the only way to exploit space behind opponents is to loft the ball over defenders’ head. For example, if the back four defend well like a wall in front of the goal, then the only way to attack the space behind the back four is to loft the ball into the penalty area. Moreover, a good lofted pass can attack the space quickly. A good example was Dennis Bergkamp’s goal vs. Argentina in the 1998 World Cup. The long lofted pass was made by Frank De Boer.

Which basic techniques can be used?

There are three basic techniques: lofted drive, volley and chip. The following organisation charts shows the details of the techniques.
Air pass organisation chartFigure 1. Organisation charts showing the basic techniques of lofted pass
The following tables summarise the advantages and disadvantages of different types of techniques:

Lofted Drive:

Contact surface & approachAdvantagesDisadvantages
1. Instep – slightly angled  approach
  • > 40 yards
  • With considerable pace, giving little chance to recover
  • Ball not rise steeply, difficult to clear defenders nearby (<10 yards)
2. Instep – wided-angled approach
wide angle
  • >40 yards
  • Not difficult to control
  • Possible to put backspin
  • Steeper trajectory
  • Can’t be hit with as much pace as some other methods. Therefore, defenders have more time to adjust position when the ball is in flight
3. Outside of the foot
outside
  • >40 yards
  • With pace
  • Can be swerved away from defenders, making interceptions more difficult
  • Difficult to control
  • Not rise steeply
  • The ball will continue to roll away after pitching, difficult to judge the pace of the pass into space
4. Inside of the foot
inside
  • >40 yards
  • With pace
  • Be swerved away from defenders
  • Be swerved into path of attacker
  • Easy to control
  • Rise reasonably steeply
  • The ball will continue to roll away after pitching, difficult to judge the pace of the pass into space

Volley Pass:

Contact surface & approachAdvantagesDisadvantages
1. Straight approach
volley straight
  • Over the heads of opponents who are a few yards from the ball
  • Played early
  • Long distances
  • With pace
  • Can be “dipped” by imparting topspin to the ball
  •  Difficult to control accuracy
  • Difficult to control pace
2. Sideway approach
volley sideway
  • Over the heads of opponents who are a few yards from  the ball
  • Long distances
  • With pace
  • Played early
  • Even more difficult to control accuracy
  • Difficult to control pace

Chip Pass:

Contact surface & approachAdvantagesDisadvantages
1. Straight approach
chip
  • Because of the backspin, the ball will rise very steeply.
  • Able to clear the heads of opponents only 5,6 yards from the ball
  • Possible to stop the ball in a small space because of backspin
  • Only 20-25 yards
  • Players running on to the pass may find the ball difficult to control as they would be moving against the spin

Reference:

Netherlands – Argentina: Bergkamp Goal 1998 (HD), 2010 [online video]. By Frank de Jong. [viewed 23 December 2013]. Available from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XsZkCFoqSBs
HUGHES, C., 1987. Soccer Tactics and Skills. Great Britain: Queen Anne Press
HUGHES, C., 1990. The Winning Formula. London: William Collins Sons & Co Ltd

Rabu, 25 Desember 2013

Football Basics - Ground pass techniques

There are five basic techniques could be used to execute a ground pass. The following table summarises the advantages and disadvantages of different types of techniques:

Type
Advantages
Disadvantages
1. Inside of the foot – Push

·         Offers the best accuracy because of the large surface of the boo presented to the ball
·         Easy for defenders to predict
·         Difficult to generate power so it is unsuitable for long passing
·         Difficult to execute on the run because it is impossible to position correctly without interrupting the stride pattern
2. Instep (laces)

·         Easy to disguise intentions
·         Possible to add power and pace to make it available both for long passing and shooting
·         Can be made while running
·         It is a difficult technique to be executed
3. Outside of the foot – flick


·         To be made with the minimum of the foot movement and maximum of disguise
·         Only be used over short distances
4. Outside of the foot – swerve

·         To be used to bend the ball around an opponent
·         Over long distance so it is a valuable shooting technique
·         Be used when running
·         Draw the ball away from the goalkeeper when crossed from a flank
·         The more swerve required, the more difficult it is to execute this technique
5. Inside of the foot – swerve

·         Bent around an opponent
·         Be used over short and long distances
·         The ball can easily be lifted a few inches over a defender’s outstretch legs
·         Great deal of swerve can be imparted
·         Draw the ball away from goalkeeper when crossed from the flank
·         Never go straight, always be spinning, possibly making control more difficult

The best footage I can think of to show the execution of the ground passes to create a goal is the second goal of Argentina vs. Serbia & Montenegro at the 2006 World Cup. Most of the passes involved were ground passes and some of the techniques they used are not covered in these 5 basic techniques (e.g. back heel pass).


Reference:

Argentina 25 passes goal, 2006 [online video]. By kwanbis. [viewed 23 December 2013]. Available from: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5W6vBI3mGE
HUGHES, C., 1987. Soccer Tactics and Skills. Great Britain: Queen Anne Press
HUGHES, C., 1990. The Winning Formula. London: William Collins Sons & Co Ltd